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Read time: 12 min


Good morning, Achiever!

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INSPIRATION

“It’s a heavy burden to look up at the mountain and want to start the climb.”

– Abby Wambach

SOCIAL CAPITAL: Build a powerful network

Average of Your 5 Friends


“Show me your friends, and I’ll show you your future.”

*quickly logs on Facebook and purges half their friends list*

Motivational speaker Jim Rohn famously said that we are the average of the five people we spend the most time with.

This makes intuitive sense, as the people you spend the most time with shape who you are, what you talk about, and which attitudes and behaviors you exhibit. Eventually, you begin to think as they think and behave as they behave.

As Darren Hardy writes in The Compound Effect:

“According to research by social psychologist Dr. David McClelland of Harvard, [the people you habitually associate with] determine as much as 95 percent of your success or failure in life.”

We don’t know about you, but the fact that the people we associate with contribute to 95% of our success is a big deal. (Good thing we’re all achievers here). Your goals, dreams, and big ideas might require a different environment than the one in which you find yourself. Sometimes to achieve what’s in your heart, you have to get out of your current environment.

We can fool ourselves into thinking that we surround ourselves with people who have great habits. We think we can ignore qualities we don’t want and focus on the good habits we want to mimic. Nevertheless, we often end up picking up those bad habits.

A 2017 study out of Northwestern University found that sitting within 25 feet of a high performer at work improved an employee’s performance by 15 percent. Conversely, sitting within 25 feet of a low performer hurt their performance by 30 percent. 30 percent! Interesting that the negative has 2x the weight of the positive.

Emotions can even spread virtually. Another study, aptly titled “I’m Sad, You’re Sad,” found that if you are in a negative mood when you text your partner, they are likely to pick up on it and experience a lower mood state themselves. According to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the same is true of Facebook posts. Emotions like happiness, sadness, and anger spread like wildfire on the platform. It’s also the books we read, the podcasts we listen to, and even the social accounts we follow (like Twitter…).

You’re shaping your reality and ultimately, your future by who you surround yourself with, follow online, books you read, and podcasts you listen to. What does your future look like? Think about what you want it to be and be mindful of who you’re following in-person and online.

Ask yourself: Who do I spend the most time with? Who are the people I most admire? Are those two groups one and the same?

ACHIEVERS’ ARMORY: Equip yourself with proven tools & tactics

The Full Focus Planner


Have you ever finished a day feeling exhausted and at the same time, feeling like you didn’t actually accomplish anything? How many times have you gotten into bed and remembered something you forgot to do that day. Occasionally feeling this way is inevitable. However, if you are not careful, those unfulfilling days can turn into weeks, months, and even years.

The Full Focus Planner was designed to help you plan out each day to ensure you are working towards your goals and accomplishing everything on your to-do list.

List Out Your Goals: The First Step (see what we did there?) is to list out 10 goals you want to accomplish. This includes both short and long term goals you want to achieve this year.

Goal Details: Simply stating a goal is not enough. In this journal, you are prompted by specific questions to breakdown why you set this goal and how you plan to achieve it.

Daily Entries: Each day is allotted two pages. Here is where you write down your big three goals for the day and then map out your entire schedule to ensure every task gets the time it deserves.

Weekly Review: At the end of each week, review the previous seven days to confirm you are still on track. Then, spend time planning for the week ahead.

Check out the layout of this planner and how it helps you plan your days, click here.

NEXT LEVEL: Keep your success going

Elon Musk & Jeff Bezos Seek to Master this Skill


Both Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos built empires by learning to think differently than the average person. It’s apparent they’re more intelligent than the average person, but they also possess an obsession with making their products better.

Constant improvement necessitates the ability to think critically. Critical thinking is the process of deep and careful thought about a subject or idea. This includes being able to analyze and weigh facts effectively, reason carefully, and make insightful connections. However, to Musk and Bezos, critical thinking isn’t just about being deeply analytical, it’s about actually being critical, looking for something wrong, something that can be improved.

“I’m always looking for what’s wrong,” Musk revealed in one interview. “In order to make [Teslas] better…I have to think very critically. So, when I see the car, I see all the things that I think need to be fixed to make it better.”

Bezos expressed a similar thought years ago when speaking to Jason Fried, CEO of Basecamp. “[Bezos] observed that the smartest people are constantly revising their understanding, reconsidering a problem they thought they’d already solved,” Fried says. “They’re open to new points of view, new information, new ideas, contradictions, and challenges to their own way of thinking.”

Critical thinking requires patience, a degree of emotional intelligence, and the ability to understand your emotions and keep them in balance.

SELF-DISCOVERY: Unleash the achiever within

Who Are You Really Mad At?


No matter how self-regulated we try to be, we all get mad at some point. Unfortunately, our anger is usually directed towards someone. We yell at our kids, snap at our spouse, write a nasty e-mail to a co-worker, or give the grocery store cashier an attitude. The thing is, the person you are taking your anger out on is usually not the person who drove you to that point in the first place.

Yes, that individual on the receiving end of your wrath may have contributed to your anger, but if you dig deeper, you may find that you are really mad at someone else altogether. Something happened or has been happening that pushed you to this point. This is called misdirected anger, and if gone unchecked, it can ruin relationships and stifle your personal and professional growth.

The next time you feel yourself getting irate or angry, take a break and ask yourself, who am I actually mad at? For example, before you get nasty with the cashier for messing up your order, examine why you may be upset at something that is so easily fixed. Chances are, you had a lousy day at work or are thinking of something else entirely. The solution in these situations is to fix the problem at work, not yell at the cashier.

The next time you want to snap at your spouse, stop and ask yourself why you are about to be mean to someone you care about. Ask yourself what this potential fight is going to resolve. If you dig just a little deeper, you may discover that you are upset about something else in your relationship. This is where you need to focus your energy. By fixing the overarching problem, you can avoid future fights and draining arguments.

It’s okay to get upset and frustrated from time to time, we’ve all been there. The fact is that it rarely does any long-term good. Instead, identify what brought you to that point and what you can do to ensure that it doesn’t happen again.

MINDSET: Train your brain to win

3 Books On Positive Mindset


We’ve written about the impact a positive mindset can have on your career, relationships, and personal life. This is some great stuff, but developing and maintaining a positive mindset can’t always be properly explained in a 400-word editorial. Check out these 3 books on the topic that expand more about perfecting your mindset.

Don’t Sweat The Small Stuff By Richard Carlson

This book tackles the everyday things that stress us out. Throughout this read, Carlson prompts us to stop and smell the roses by appreciating the little joy that life offers. He also guides us towards controlling our emotions and keeping everything in perspective.

A Year Of Positive Thinking By Cyndie Spiegel

In this book, author Cyndie Spiegel guides you through an entire year of positive thinking through a series of affirmations, exercises, and more. Each day you will be greeted with the inspiration, wisdom, and courage you need to create and maintain a positive mindset.

The Little Book of Positivity By Lucy Lane

This book is simple, concise, and straightforward. It will provide bite-sized bits of motivation and inspiration in the form of quotes and easy to follow tips. These can be worked into your morning routine or be read at the end of a long, hard day.

We can sense your mind growing already.

FUN STUFF – Tuesday Trivia

On this day in 1928, sliced bread was sold for the first time by the Chillicothe Baking Company of Chillicothe, Missouri.

We’ve been packing sandwiches in our lunch boxes ever since.

NEWS BREAK: Stay informed

  • Covid-19 antibody-drug moves into phase 3 of clinical trials.
  • Broadway star Nick Cordero dies after spending more than 90 days in the hospital.
  • Colin Kaepernick signed a production deal with Disney to film a docuseries from ESPN Films about Kaepernick’s life and journey from San Francisco 49ers quarterback to civil rights leader.
  • The S&P 500 Index posted its fifth-straight increase, its longest winning streak since December, with tech stocks leading the way. Amazon.com Inc. shares rose past $3,000 for the first time.

1% BETTER: Improve each day

Read the Amazon reviews for one of the books listed in today’s Mindset editorial